What is Industrial Distribution?

Industrial distribution applies mathematics, science, engineering technology, business, data processing, communications, quality, and supply chain management to the wholesaling and distribution of industrial and commercial products. The Distribution Industry is one the largest segments of the U.S. economy.

Why study Industrial Distribution at Texas A&M?

  • The industrial distribution program at Texas A&M is one of the oldest and largest (in terms of student enrollment and faculty size) programs in the country, and is revered as the number-one-ranked ID program by industry and academia throughout North America.
  • Students gain skills and education to prepare them for a fascinating career path combining engineering technical knowledge, hands-on experience, business savvy, great communication skills, and leadership.
  • One of the oldest and largest programs in the country with over 900 students
  • Average starting salary: $58,000 / Average number of job offers: 2.5
  • The ID Program is consistently among the highest recruited programs.
  • Revered as the number one ranked ID program by the industry and academia in North America.
  • Graduates receive a Bachelor of Science in Industrial Distribution from the Top 10 ranked College of Engineering at Texas A&M.

What Makes ID Unique?

  • Industry Involvement in the Classroom: Representatives from a variety of industries share their experience in the classroom setting while developing student awareness of the employment opportunities within their channel.
  • Internships: Internship positions enable students to gain real-world experience. Firms that sponsor internships are able to market their industry and company while securing cost-effective temporary employees to tackle short term projects.
  • Experiential Learning: Students are given the chance to better understand the industry through hands-on class projects that are focused on real-world challenges.
  • Company Site Visits: Opportunity to expose Industrial Distribution students to real-world environments. Visits act as a bridge between classroom learning and industry practices.